Workshop Story Publications

Factor FourIt’s been a great year for participants of Storied Imaginarium workshops. The Fall workshops for Intersections: Science Fiction, Fairy Tales and Myth are filling up fast.  There is only one seat open in the Thursday evening workshop (6:30-9 pm MST) and two seats open in the Tuesday mid-morning workshop (10 am-12:30 pm MST). The third workshop will most likely be held either Tuesday or Thursday afternoon, depending on participant availability.

In the meantime, enjoy these wonderful stories that originated in past workshops. Welcome to the Storied Imaginarium.

Other VoicesArabella and the Spiders” by KT Wagner, Factor Four Magazine: Issue 4, January 2019. (Intersections: Arachne Myth and Spiderwoman Stories & Cosmic Web Module)

“Urban Moon” by Mercedes Murdock Yardley, Other Voices, Other Tombs, edited by Brhel & Sullivan, July 2019.  (Monstrous Women: The Shifting Shapes of Animal Brides)

A Shake in Her Boneless Soul” by Cassandra Schoeber, Bone & Ink Lit Zine, July 2019. (Intersections: Snow White & Human Neuro-Reanimation)

Interzone“The Frog’s Prince; or, Iron Henry” by N.A. Sulway, Interzone #282, Jul.–Aug. 2019. (Intersections: Iron Henry & Invasive Species)

Within This Body of Stone I Scream” by Cassandra Schoeber, The Arcanist, August 2019. (Intersections: Golem Myths and Ancient Viruses & the Spark of Life)

“Beneath Her Skin” by KT Wagner, The Twisted Book of Shadows, edited by Christopher Golden and James A. Moore, October 2019. (Monstrous Women: Matriarchal Monsters and First Females)

not-all-monsters-v2.jpg“Unfettered” by Leslie Wibberley, Not All Monsters, edited by Sara Tantlinger, Forthcoming. (Intersections: Firebird & Bioluminescence)

“The Making of Asylum Ophelia” by Mercedes Murdock Yardley, Miscreations: Gods, Monstrosities & Other Horrors, edited by Doug Murano and Michael Bailey, Forthcoming. (Monstrous Women: The Female Descent into Hysteria and Madness)Miscreations

Monstrous Women NEWS!

avignon
Les Demoiselles d’Avignon by Pablo Picasso

Last Fall, I offered the first modules of Monstrous Women. I’d always envisioned it as a generative workshop with two distinct sets of classes, but the funny thing is that monstrous women and women monsters refuse to be sorted and placed in tidy categories. I noticed some overlap, and so I decided to just run with it.

At the end of August, I will be running the second collection of Monstrous Women with all new material. This semester the selections will focus on The Shifting Shapes of Animal Brides, The Seductive Allure of the Femme Fatale, Weeping Women and Tearful Prophecies, The Female Descent into Hysteria and Madness, and Mayhem in Numbers and the Sacred Three. At the moment, there are only TWO seats left in the Thursday evening course. (Note: This is Friday morning AEDT for the Australian writers.) Come join us. It’s going to be a monstrously wonderful time.

On a side note, if you’re interested in the course, but don’t know what to expect, check out the pieces below, which were published by alums of the first session of Monstrous Women. Enjoy!

The Velvet Castles of the Night” by Claire Eliza Bartlett (Daily Science Fiction)

They wait for you, in the velvet castles of the night.

It’s not like they have anything better to do. Everyone knows the story stops for the hero, and who would the hero be but you? That is why every mirror in every inn in this town is enchanted, showing chiseled jaws, sculpted arms. Nine out of ten heroes have a verified need for encouragement along the way.

Author’s Notes: “The Velvet Castles of the Night” was inspired by the Monstrous Women class on vampires, and my own dislike of vampires, particularly female ones, and the way they are depicted in media.

Author Bio: Claire Eliza Bartlett is a US citizen who grew up in Colorado. She studied history and archaeology and spent time in Switzerland and Wales before settling in Denmark for good. When not at her computer telling mostly false stories, she works as a tour guide in Copenhagen, telling stories that are (mostly) true.

“Hidden in the Shadow of a God” by Cassandra Schoeber (Beneath Yggdrasil’s Shadow)

Odin wasn’t returning. I’d been a fool. Thinking I was special to be granted beauty, to share his bed. Believing that because Odin chose me, that meant that I was still one of the gods. But every time he left, his magic seeped out of my veins. And I waited and waited, dependent on his good will and his return.

Like god, like man.

The bastard had used me. He’d enticed me, fucked me, and left me behind.

Without Odin, I had no more magic. And without his magic, I was only one thing.

The Hidden One.

37375855_823846428004387_3958543791899541504_oAuthor’s Notes: Intrigued by the tales of the Norse gods, I was listening to Neil Gaiman read aloud from his book on Norse Mythology. In his forward, he mentions that only a few Norse goddesses are remembered in story today. Many goddesses have names, but their lives and their deeds have long been forgotten. Curious, I researched the “forgotten ones”, intent on giving one of those goddesses a voice. I decided upon Hulda, who is only mentioned briefly as a witch and Odin’s mistress. I figured it must take a great woman to attract both the Allfather’s attention and ultimately his rejection, and so the seed for this story was planted.

In addition, during Monstrous Women, I discovered that the word “hulder” – the term for a female seductress with a cow’s tail – may have originated from Hulda’s name. I merged the two concepts, blending together the voice of a tale-less goddess with the plight of a woman cursed with the tail of a cow. And so, after hundreds of years forgotten, Hulda’s story is finally being told.

Author Bio: Cassandra Schoeber is a dark fantasy and horror writer. Unfortunately, there are times when her stories escape the page, wreak havoc, and eat innocent bystanders. She has published one novella, Ravenous with Fantasia Divinity Magazine, as well as several short stories, including: “Let It Snow” (Silver Apples Magazine); “When the Last Petal Falls” (Fantasia Divinity Magazine); “Hidden in the Shadow of a God” (Fantasia Divinity Magazine); and “He Knows” (Short and Twisted Christmas Tales).