The Folklore of Glamis Castle

glamis 2Have you ever wondered about what goes bump in the night?  Ever seen the spooky spectres who haunt the halls or heard footsteps on the floor above you when you know no one is there?  As Halloween draws near, we hear about ghosts and spirits, demons and imps that terrorize our homes and attack the everyday person.  We will not be talking about those today, however, and instead we will be focusing on some famous ghosts that haunt the Glamis Castle all the way in Scotland.

Quick history of the castle itself: it was originally built during the fourteenth century and sits beside the village of Glamis in Angus, Scotland and has been home to the Lyon family since then.  Which brings us to our ghosts. Over these centuries, the castle has become the home to several famous ghosts, with many accounts by eyewitnesses who have come face-to-face with them — in a manner of speaking.

Our first famous ghost is the woman without a tongue.  No one knows who she was, however many people have reported seeing her wandering around the grounds, pointing to her disfigured face, or even staring out of the barred castle windows.  Next up is out young servant boy who has been spotted sitting by the door of the Queen’s room on multiple occasions, quietly waiting. Though not much is known about either of these spirits, we do have two very famous ghosts that have been known to roam these halls.

glamis 3The grey lady is reportedly the ghost of Lady Glamis — or Lady Janet Douglas.  Lady Glamis was burned at the stake in 1537 supposedly because she was a witch, accused of murdering her husband and planning on poisoning the King — King James V of Scotland.  Though she was accused of poisoning her first husband, she was acquitted and so married her second husband. However, nine years after her husband’s death in 1528, she was accused of planning to murder to king.  She was innocent, of course, but that didn’t stop the king from torturing her family and servants until she was convicted, resulting in her being burned at the stake on July 17,1537. Now, people claim to see the grey lady as she runs up the stairs in the clock tower, supposedly leaving a trail of ash in her wake.

The final of our famous ghosts is the ghost of Alexander Lindsay, 4th Earl of Crawford — also known as Earl Beardie.  The story of our Earl goes like this: supposedly he was cruel man who tended to drink heavily, and — according to legend — he had been visiting the castle at the time and returned, drunk and shouting, looking for someone to play cards with.  However, it was the Sabbath, and since no one would take him up on his challenge, he shouted that he’d play the Devil himself. Well, soon after there was a knock at the door, and standing there was a tall man in a long, dark coat — though some stories claim he wore a dark, hooded robe.  He asked if the Earl still needed someone to play cards with, and together they locked themselves in a room in the castle and proceeded to play cards into the night. Well, following this, loud swearing and shouting began to come from the room, and a servant peeking through the keyhole to see what was going on was blinded in that eye and was sent away, accused of spying.  However, that was the last time the Earl was seen — the man had disappeared, along with Earl. It is said that to this day, he is still playing cards in his secret room, shouts echoing from within. It is also said that children who stay in the castle wake in the middle of the night to see a dark figure standing over them, watching them sleep.

glamis 1We might not know what exactly lurks in the darkness, but when we hear these stories we are reminded that some people are never forgotten.  Whether it is a trail of ash or the screaming shouts of a drunk Earl, there are reminders of the past everywhere. That is, if one is only brave enough to stay around after dark and find them.

For more reading on the ghosts of Glamis castle (sources):

https://www.rd.com/culture/most-haunted-places-world/

https://www.hauntedrooms.co.uk/glamis-castle-angus-scotland

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